Thor's Cave (also known as Thor's House Cavern and Thyrsis's Cave)
       
     
Rudyard Lake
       
     
Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall
       
     
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
       
     
The Jurassic Coast
       
     
Stoke Plaza
       
     
Thor's Cave (also known as Thor's House Cavern and Thyrsis's Cave)
       
     
Thor's Cave (also known as Thor's House Cavern and Thyrsis's Cave)

Thor's Cave (also known as Thor's House Cavern and Thyrsis's Cave) is a natural cavern located at SK09865496 in the Manifold Valley of the White Peak in Staffordshire, England. It is classified as a Karst cave. Located in a steep limestone crag, the cave entrance, a symmetrical arch 7.5 metres wide and 10 metres high, is prominently visible from the valley bottom, around 80 metres (260 feet) below. Reached by an easy stepped path from the Manifold Way, the cave is a popular tourist spot, with views over the Manifold Valley. The second entrance is known as the "West Window", below which is a second cave, Thor's Fissure Cavern.

Thor's Cave was served by a railway station on the Leek and Manifold Valley Light Railway from 1904 to 1934; the disused line now forms the Manifold Way.

Rudyard Lake
       
     
Rudyard Lake

The village of Rudyard was named after Ralph Rudyard, a local man reputed to have killed Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field.Rudyard Lake was constructed by the engineer John Rennie, for the Trent and Mersey Canal company in 1797–98 to feed the Caldon Canal The reservoir had been proposed in 1796, and would have been connected to the upper level of the Caldon Canal by a feeder, but in order to win the consent of landowners, the 3.3-mile (5.3 km) section below Leek was made navigable. The bill to promote the construction failed in Parliament, and there was a suggestion for a bigger scheme, involving a canal from Marple on the Peak Forest Canal to the Caldon Canal, passing through Macclesfield and Rudyard. Benjamin Outram, the engineer for the Peak Forest Canal, would have overseen the project, and again, it would have involved a reservoir at Rudyard. However, the Trent and Mersey re-submitted their bill in early 1797, and it became an Act of Parliament in March.

As built, the lake is around 2 miles (3.2 km) long and 0.25 miles (0.40 km) wide. It was formed by creating a 63-foot (19 m) earth dam at the southern end of the steep wooded valley, which is faced with stone on the upstream side, to prevent erosion. A spillway, some 60 feet (18 m) wide, was built at the eastern side of the dam, and feeds the 2.5-mile (4 km) feeder than carries water to the Leek Branch. The main source of water supply to the lake is a feeder that runs from the headwaters of the River Dane. This was refurbished in the mid-1990s by the Waterway Recovery Group. The lake has gradually silted up, but there are problems associated with dredging it, due to a lack of access for vehicles, and English Nature's concern over the disturbance of some rare fauna.

On 26 June 1846 the North Staffordshire Railway successfully took over the canal company and lake as part of one of its acts of parliament that resulted in the formation of the North Staffordshire Railway. Having acquired the lake and the land around it the railway used the land down one side as the route for its Churnet Valley Line between Macclesfield and Uttoxeter. Two stations were built, one at Rudyard village (later renamed Rudyard Lake) and one at the north end of the lake called Rudyard Lake (later renamed Cliffe Park)

Because of the accessibility brought by the railway stations, daytrippers and tourists began visiting the lake. Visitors included John Lockwood Kipling and Alice Macdonald, the parents of Rudyard Kipling, who met there on a trip from Burslem. They liked the place so much they named their son after it.[1] By the end of the 19th century, crowds of up to 20,000 people could visit the lake on some days.[2] Its popularaity continued into the early 20th century, and over 20,000 visitors were carried to the site on 88 trains on a particular day in 1913.[6] Matthew Webb, the first man to swim the English Channel, entertained crowds by demonstrating his swimming in the lake, and Carlos Trower (the African Blondin) performed a tightrope walk across the lake.

Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall

The property was sold in 1540 to James Leveson, a Wolverhampton wool merchant. The Leveson family occupied the property and Sir Richard Leveson built a new house in 1634. The Leveson heiress Frances married Sir Thomas Gower Bt leading to the creation of the Leveson Gower family. It was a large Elizabethan house, which was probably demolished to make way for a later Georgian house.Their son Sir William Leveson-Gower, 4th Baronet built a new house on the site in 1690.

Around 1730, John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower erected a hall based on Buckingham House. It was substantially altered by his son 1st Marquess of Stafford, from designs by Henry Holland, in 1775–78.

Trentham Hall in the 1820s, before the 19th century expansion.

Trentham Hall in 1880 from Morris's Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen. The front entrance is at the left, leading into the three-storey main house. The two-storey family wing is at the right, beyond the campanile.

The country house, of which parts remain, dates from 1833–42 was designed by Charles Barry, while he was working on the rebuild of the Palace of Westminster. He was commissioned by 2nd Duke of Sutherland.[citation needed] The focal point of the building was a 100 feet (30 m) square campanile clock tower.The original approach to the hall was from the west, and an Italianate Grand Entrance was part of the western front. The one-story arcade range is semi-circular with side wings. It was made of plastered brick and ashlar, and had unfluted Ionic columns each side of its bays, as well as a balustrade above the cornice. The centre has a three-arched entrance with Porte-cochère projects, and a coat of arms is carved above. The right wing incorporates an orangery that was originally built in 1808 by Heathcote Tatham.Barry spent over 10 years improving the house, as well as adding a new block including state bedrooms and dressing rooms, as well as servant's quarters, a sculpture gallery, and a clock tower.[citation needed] This interesting complex, with its clock tower, is generally known as the Riding School, designed in 1840 and built between 1841-50. It stands on the perimeter of a large cobbled stableyard, and represents the last major addition to, and almost sole survivor of the once-exciting and impressive Trentham Hall.

In 1851 it was described as being an "elegant mansion". It had been completely rebuilt in the previous 14 years, and had a stone front. It housed an extensive collection of paintings.

It is surrounded by an 18th- and 19th-century park designed by Lancelot Brown.The house served as the Staffordshire seat of the Duke of Sutherland,[citation needed whose traditional burial place was Trentham Mausoleum nearby.

In the southern extremity of the Trentham Estate stands the monument to the 1st Duke of Sutherland. This colossal statue, designed by Winks and sculptured by Chantrey, surmounts a plain column of stone on a tiered pedestal. The monument was raised in 1834 at the instigation of the second Duke, a year after the first Duke's death. A wide range of possible monuments was put forward but it was Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey, with whom Loch, the Duke's Chief Agent, had been in touch, who recommended Sir Charles Barry for the design of the monument.

Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall

The property was sold in 1540 to James Leveson, a Wolverhampton wool merchant. The Leveson family occupied the property and Sir Richard Leveson built a new house in 1634. The Leveson heiress Frances married Sir Thomas Gower Bt leading to the creation of the Leveson Gower family. It was a large Elizabethan house, which was probably demolished to make way for a later Georgian house.Their son Sir William Leveson-Gower, 4th Baronet built a new house on the site in 1690.

Around 1730, John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower erected a hall based on Buckingham House. It was substantially altered by his son 1st Marquess of Stafford, from designs by Henry Holland, in 1775–78.

Trentham Hall in the 1820s, before the 19th century expansion.

Trentham Hall in 1880 from Morris's Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen. The front entrance is at the left, leading into the three-storey main house. The two-storey family wing is at the right, beyond the campanile.

The country house, of which parts remain, dates from 1833–42 was designed by Charles Barry, while he was working on the rebuild of the Palace of Westminster. He was commissioned by 2nd Duke of Sutherland.[citation needed] The focal point of the building was a 100 feet (30 m) square campanile clock tower.The original approach to the hall was from the west, and an Italianate Grand Entrance was part of the western front. The one-story arcade range is semi-circular with side wings. It was made of plastered brick and ashlar, and had unfluted Ionic columns each side of its bays, as well as a balustrade above the cornice. The centre has a three-arched entrance with Porte-cochère projects, and a coat of arms is carved above. The right wing incorporates an orangery that was originally built in 1808 by Heathcote Tatham.Barry spent over 10 years improving the house, as well as adding a new block including state bedrooms and dressing rooms, as well as servant's quarters, a sculpture gallery, and a clock tower.[citation needed] This interesting complex, with its clock tower, is generally known as the Riding School, designed in 1840 and built between 1841-50. It stands on the perimeter of a large cobbled stableyard, and represents the last major addition to, and almost sole survivor of the once-exciting and impressive Trentham Hall.

In 1851 it was described as being an "elegant mansion". It had been completely rebuilt in the previous 14 years, and had a stone front. It housed an extensive collection of paintings.

It is surrounded by an 18th- and 19th-century park designed by Lancelot Brown.The house served as the Staffordshire seat of the Duke of Sutherland,[citation needed whose traditional burial place was Trentham Mausoleum nearby.

In the southern extremity of the Trentham Estate stands the monument to the 1st Duke of Sutherland. This colossal statue, designed by Winks and sculptured by Chantrey, surmounts a plain column of stone on a tiered pedestal. The monument was raised in 1834 at the instigation of the second Duke, a year after the first Duke's death. A wide range of possible monuments was put forward but it was Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey, with whom Loch, the Duke's Chief Agent, had been in touch, who recommended Sir Charles Barry for the design of the monument.

Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall

The property was sold in 1540 to James Leveson, a Wolverhampton wool merchant. The Leveson family occupied the property and Sir Richard Leveson built a new house in 1634. The Leveson heiress Frances married Sir Thomas Gower Bt leading to the creation of the Leveson Gower family. It was a large Elizabethan house, which was probably demolished to make way for a later Georgian house.Their son Sir William Leveson-Gower, 4th Baronet built a new house on the site in 1690.

Around 1730, John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower erected a hall based on Buckingham House. It was substantially altered by his son 1st Marquess of Stafford, from designs by Henry Holland, in 1775–78.

Trentham Hall in the 1820s, before the 19th century expansion.

Trentham Hall in 1880 from Morris's Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen. The front entrance is at the left, leading into the three-storey main house. The two-storey family wing is at the right, beyond the campanile.

The country house, of which parts remain, dates from 1833–42 was designed by Charles Barry, while he was working on the rebuild of the Palace of Westminster. He was commissioned by 2nd Duke of Sutherland.[citation needed] The focal point of the building was a 100 feet (30 m) square campanile clock tower.The original approach to the hall was from the west, and an Italianate Grand Entrance was part of the western front. The one-story arcade range is semi-circular with side wings. It was made of plastered brick and ashlar, and had unfluted Ionic columns each side of its bays, as well as a balustrade above the cornice. The centre has a three-arched entrance with Porte-cochère projects, and a coat of arms is carved above. The right wing incorporates an orangery that was originally built in 1808 by Heathcote Tatham.Barry spent over 10 years improving the house, as well as adding a new block including state bedrooms and dressing rooms, as well as servant's quarters, a sculpture gallery, and a clock tower.[citation needed] This interesting complex, with its clock tower, is generally known as the Riding School, designed in 1840 and built between 1841-50. It stands on the perimeter of a large cobbled stableyard, and represents the last major addition to, and almost sole survivor of the once-exciting and impressive Trentham Hall.

In 1851 it was described as being an "elegant mansion". It had been completely rebuilt in the previous 14 years, and had a stone front. It housed an extensive collection of paintings.

It is surrounded by an 18th- and 19th-century park designed by Lancelot Brown.The house served as the Staffordshire seat of the Duke of Sutherland,[citation needed whose traditional burial place was Trentham Mausoleum nearby.

In the southern extremity of the Trentham Estate stands the monument to the 1st Duke of Sutherland. This colossal statue, designed by Winks and sculptured by Chantrey, surmounts a plain column of stone on a tiered pedestal. The monument was raised in 1834 at the instigation of the second Duke, a year after the first Duke's death. A wide range of possible monuments was put forward but it was Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey, with whom Loch, the Duke's Chief Agent, had been in touch, who recommended Sir Charles Barry for the design of the monument.

Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall
Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches

The Roaches (from the French les roches - the rocks) is a prominent rocky ridge above Leek and Tittesworth Reservoir in the Peak District of England. The ridge with its rock formations rises steeply to 505 m (1,657 ft).

Along with Ramshaw Rocks and Hen Cloud they form a gritstone escarpment, which is popular with hikers, rock climbers and freerunners. It is often very busy especially at weekends.

The Roaches Estate which includes Hen Cloud was purchased by the Peak District National Park Authority in the 1980s to safeguard the area from adverse development. From May 2013 Staffordshire Wildlife Trust took on the management of the Roaches Estate.

In clear conditions, it is possible to see much of Cheshire and views stretching as far as Snowdon in Wales and Winter Hill in Lancashire.

The Roaches are the most prominent part of a curving ridge which extends for several miles from Hen Cloud in the south to Back Forest and Hangingstone in the northwest. At the top there is a small pool called Doxey Pool that is, according to legend, inhabited by a water spirit. Nearby are the broad hills of Gun and Morridge.

The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches

The Roaches (from the French les roches - the rocks) is a prominent rocky ridge above Leek and Tittesworth Reservoir in the Peak District of England. The ridge with its rock formations rises steeply to 505 m (1,657 ft).

Along with Ramshaw Rocks and Hen Cloud they form a gritstone escarpment, which is popular with hikers, rock climbers and freerunners. It is often very busy especially at weekends.

The Roaches Estate which includes Hen Cloud was purchased by the Peak District National Park Authority in the 1980s to safeguard the area from adverse development. From May 2013 Staffordshire Wildlife Trust took on the management of the Roaches Estate.

In clear conditions, it is possible to see much of Cheshire and views stretching as far as Snowdon in Wales and Winter Hill in Lancashire.

The Roaches are the most prominent part of a curving ridge which extends for several miles from Hen Cloud in the south to Back Forest and Hangingstone in the northwest. At the top there is a small pool called Doxey Pool that is, according to legend, inhabited by a water spirit. Nearby are the broad hills of Gun and Morridge.

The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
The Roaches
       
     
The Roaches
The Jurassic Coast
       
     
The Jurassic Coast

The Jurassic Coast is a World Heritage Site on the English Channel coast of southern England. It stretches from Exmouth in East Devon to Studland Bay in Dorset, a distance of about 96 mi (154 km), and was inscribed on the World Heritage List in mid-December 2001

The site spans 185 million years of geological history, coastal erosion having exposed an almost continuous sequence of rock formation covering the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. At different times, this area has been desert, shallow tropical sea and marsh, and the fossilised remains of the various creatures that lived here have been preserved in the rocks.

Natural features seen on this stretch of coast include arches, pinnacles and stack rocks. In some places the sea has broken through resistant rocks to produce coves with restricted entrances, and in one place, the Isle of Portland is connected to the land by a narrow spit. In some parts of the coast, landslides are common. These have exposed a wide range of fossils, the different rock types each having its own typical fauna and flora, thus providing evidence of how animals and plants evolved in this region.

The area around Lulworth Cove contains a fossil forest, and 71 different rock strata have been identified at Lyme Regis, each with its own species of ammonite. The fossil collector Mary Anning lived here and her major discoveries of marine reptiles and other fossils were made at a time when the study of palaeontology was just starting to develop. The Charmouth Heritage Coast Centre provides information on the heritage coast, and the whole length of the site can be visited via the South West Coast Path.s a World Heritage Site on the English Channel coast of southern England. It stretches from Exmouth in East Devon to Studland Bay in Dorset, a distance of about 96 mi (154 km), and was inscribed on the World Heritage List in mid-December 2001

The site spans 185 million years of geological history, coastal erosion having exposed an almost continuous sequence of rock formation covering the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. At different times, this area has been desert, shallow tropical sea and marsh, and the fossilised remains of the various creatures that lived here have been preserved in the rocks.

Natural features seen on this stretch of coast include arches, pinnacles and stack rocks. In some places the sea has broken through resistant rocks to produce coves with restricted entrances, and in one place, the Isle of Portland is connected to the land by a narrow spit. In some parts of the coast, landslides are common. These have exposed a wide range of fossils, the different rock types each having its own typical fauna and flora, thus providing evidence of how animals and plants evolved in this region.

The area around Lulworth Cove contains a fossil forest, and 71 different rock strata have been identified at Lyme Regis, each with its own species of ammonite. The fossil collector Mary Anning lived here and her major discoveries of marine reptiles and other fossils were made at a time when the study of palaeontology was just starting to develop. The Charmouth Heritage Coast Centre provides information on the heritage coast, and the whole length of the site can be visited via the South West Coast Path.

Stoke Plaza
       
     
Stoke Plaza

Stoke Plaza is a huge all concrete course that was built in 2010 and can be found in Central Forest Park and is solely a street plaza with a small bowl section at the side.

The plaza area is massive and is centralised around a focal point in the middle and set on multiple levels with flat banks, stair sets, rails, hubbas, manny pads and ledges transitioning between them. The bowl section at the back is made up of three circular bowls all joined together that are each at differing depths with some nice bumps and corners between them to pump along.

Stoke Plaza is an amazing facility and if you are a street skater this is a must visit. There are endless numbers of lines that can be hit here and a lot of space between obstacles to adjust between tricks. The surfaces are smooth and fast, making this a must visit spot whether you are from the area or beyond