Trentham Hall
       
     
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Trentham Hall
       
     
Trentham Hall

Trentham Hall

The property was sold in 1540 to James Leveson, a Wolverhampton wool merchant. The Leveson family occupied the property and Sir Richard Leveson built a new house in 1634. The Leveson heiress Frances married Sir Thomas Gower Bt leading to the creation of the Leveson Gower family.It was a large Elizabethan house, which was probably demolished to make way for a later Georgian house.[citation needed] Their son Sir William Leveson-Gower, 4th Baronet built a new house on the site in 1690.

Around 1730, John Leveson-Gower, 1st Earl Gower erected a hall based on Buckingham House. It was substantially altered by his son 1st Marquess of Stafford, from designs by Henry Holland, in 1775–78.

Trentham Hall in the 1820s, before the 19th century expansion.

Trentham Hall in 1880 from Morris's Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen. The front entrance is at the left, leading into the three-storey main house. The two-storey family wing is at the right, beyond the campanile.

The country house, of which parts remain, dates from 1833–42 was designed by Charles Barry, while he was working on the rebuild of the Palace of Westminster. He was commissioned by 2nd Duke of Sutherland. The focal point of the building was a 100 feet (30 m) square campanile clock tower.

The original approach to the hall was from the west, and an Italianate Grand Entrance was part of the western front. The one-story arcade range is semi-circular with side wings. It was made of plastered brick and ashlar, and had unfluted Ionic columns each side of its bays, as well as a balustrade above the cornice. The centre has a three-arched entrance with Porte-cochère projects, and a coat of arms is carved above. The right wing incorporates an orangery that was originally built in 1808 by Heathcote Tatham.

Barry spent over 10 years improving the house, as well as adding a new block including state bedrooms and dressing rooms, as well as servant's quarters, a sculpture gallery, and a clock tower. This interesting complex, with its clock tower, is generally known as the Riding School, designed in 1840 and built between 1841-50. It stands on the perimeter of a large cobbled stableyard, and represents the last major addition to, and almost sole survivor of the once-exciting and impressive Trentham Hall.

In 1851 it was described as being an "elegant mansion". It had been completely rebuilt in the previous 14 years, and had a stone front. It housed an extensive collection of paintings.

It is surrounded by an 18th- and 19th-century park designed by Lancelot Brown.The house served as the Staffordshire seat of the Duke of Sutherland whose traditional burial place was Trentham Mausoleum nearby.

In the southern extremity of the Trentham Estate stands the monument to the 1st Duke of Sutherland. [8] This colossal statue, designed by Winks and sculptured by Chantrey, surmounts a plain column of stone on a tiered pedestal. The monument was raised in 1834 at the instigation of the second Duke, a year after the first Duke's death. A wide range of possible monuments was put forward but it was Sir Francis Leggatt Chantrey, with whom Loch, the Duke's Chief Agent, had been in touch, who recommended Sir Charles Barry for the design of the monument.

Trentham Gardens34.JPG
       
     
Trentham Gardens35 copy.JPG
       
     
Trentham Gardens63.JPG
       
     
Trentham Gardens65 (1).JPG