British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill
       
     
British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill
       
     
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(2012-12-20 12-32-59)Copyright- This image may only be used once permission has been granted by the copyright holder Rob Leyland NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (3538x2450).JPG
       
     
(2012-12-20 12-34-18)Copyright- This image may only be used once permission has been granted by the copyright holder Rob Leyland NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (3226x2658).JPG
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
NOTE TO DESKS- All images remain copyright. Photo credit to read - Rob Leyland . http---robleylandphotography.com- http---www.flickr.com-photos-49828961N02- NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (3680x2031).JPG
       
     
NOTE TO DESKS- All images remain copyright. Photo credit to read - Rob Leyland . http---robleylandphotography.com- http---www.flickr.com-photos-49828961N02- NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (2690x1762).JPG
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers.
       
     
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2nd Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers
       
     
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2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers
       
     
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Irish Guards Crossmaglen
       
     
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Irish Guards
       
     
Irish Guards
       
     
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Irish Guards
       
     
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Royal Anglian Regiment
       
     
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Royal Anglian Regiment
       
     
British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill
       
     
British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill

More than 300,000 British soldiers served in Northern Ireland during that campaign, with more than 500 members of the regular army killed. British Army soldiers themselves were responsible for the deaths of more than 300 people, over half of them civilians.The Troubles (Irish: Na Trioblóidí) was an ethno-nationalist conflict in Northern Ireland during the late 20th century. Also known internationally as the Northern Ireland conflict,and the Conflict in Ireland,it is sometimes described as a "guerrilla war" or a "low-level war".[23][24][25][26] The conflict began in the late 1960s and is usually deemed to have ended with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.[29]Although the Troubles primarily took place in Northern Ireland, at times the violence spilled over into parts of the Republic of Ireland, England, and mainland Europe.

The conflict was primarily political and nationalistic, fuelled by historical events. It also had an ethnic or sectarian dimension,[32] although it was not a religious conflict.A key issue was the constitutional status of Northern Ireland. Unionists/loyalists, who were mostly Protestants, wanted Northern Ireland to remain within the United Kingdom. Irish nationalists/republicans, who were mostly Catholics, wanted Northern Ireland to leave the United Kingdom and join a united Ireland.The conflict began during a campaign to end discrimination against the Catholic/nationalist minority by the Protestant/unionist government and police force. The authorities attempted to suppress this protest campaign and were accused of police brutality; it was also met with violence from loyalists, who alleged it was a republican front. Increasing inter-communal violence, and conflict between nationalist youths and police, eventually led to riots in August 1969 and the deployment of British troops. Some Catholics initially welcomed the army as a more neutral force, but it soon came to be seen as hostile and biased.[36] The emergence of armed paramilitary organisations led to the subsequent warfare over the next three decades.The main participants in the Troubles were republican paramilitaries such as the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) and the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA); loyalist paramilitaries such as the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) and Ulster Defence Association (UDA); British state security forces – the British Army and Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC); and political activists and politicians. The security forces of the Republic played a smaller role. Republican paramilitaries carried out a guerrilla campaign against the British security forces, as well as a bombing campaign against infrastructure, commercial and political targets. Loyalists targeted republicans/nationalists, and attacked the wider Catholic community in what they claimed was retaliation. At times there were bouts of sectarian tit-for-tat violence. The British security forces undertook both a policing and a counter-insurgency role, primarily against republicans. There were some incidents of collusion between British security forces and loyalists. The Troubles also involved numerous riots, mass protests and acts of civil disobedience, and led to segregation and the creation of no-go areas.More than 3,500 people were killed in the conflict, of whom 52% were civilians, 32% were members of the British security forces, and 16% were members of paramilitary groups.There has been sporadic violence since the Good Friday Agreement was signed, including a campaign by anti-ceasefire republicans.

British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill
       
     
British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill

British Army Air Corp Lynx helicopter re-supplies Romeo 12 on Sugarloaf Hill - with essential supplies ,one of the eight towers equipped with surveillance and listening devices looking out over south Armagh.All the towers are supplied by air .South Armagh, home to one of the most ruthless IRA brigades, was nicknamed "bandit country"it and has long been hostile territory for the British Army.

(2003-04-03 23-45-32)FUJI PHOTO FILM CO. LTD. SP-2000 (2700x1796).JPG
       
     
(2012-12-20 12-32-59)Copyright- This image may only be used once permission has been granted by the copyright holder Rob Leyland NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (3538x2450).JPG
       
     
(2012-12-20 12-34-18)Copyright- This image may only be used once permission has been granted by the copyright holder Rob Leyland NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (3226x2658).JPG
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment

The Royal Irish Regiment mostly volunteers living and working in the province ,reguarly patrol The southern part of the County Armagh that has been a stronghold of support for the IRA, earning it the nickname "Bandit Country" though this is widely regarded as an untrue media label that has resulted in the vilification and demonisation of the local community South Armagh is predominantly nationalist, with most of the population being opposed to any form of British presence, especially that of a military nature. The most prominent opposition to British rule was the Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade.

The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment

The Royal Irish Regiment mostly volunteers living and working in the province ,reguarly patrol The southern part of the County Armagh that has been a stronghold of support for the IRA, earning it the nickname "Bandit Country" though this is widely regarded as an untrue media label that has resulted in the vilification and demonisation of the local community South Armagh is predominantly nationalist, with most of the population being opposed to any form of British presence, especially that of a military nature. The most prominent opposition to British rule was the Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade.

The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment

The Royal Irish Regiment mostly volunteers living and working in the province ,reguarly patrol The southern part of the County Armagh that has been a stronghold of support for the IRA, earning it the nickname "Bandit Country" though this is widely regarded as an untrue media label that has resulted in the vilification and demonisation of the local community South Armagh is predominantly nationalist, with most of the population being opposed to any form of British presence, especially that of a military nature. The most prominent opposition to British rule was the Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade.

NOTE TO DESKS- All images remain copyright. Photo credit to read - Rob Leyland . http---robleylandphotography.com- http---www.flickr.com-photos-49828961N02- NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (3680x2031).JPG
       
     
NOTE TO DESKS- All images remain copyright. Photo credit to read - Rob Leyland . http---robleylandphotography.com- http---www.flickr.com-photos-49828961N02- NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D1H (2690x1762).JPG
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment
       
     
The Royal Irish Regiment

The Royal Irish Regiment mostly volunteers living and working in the province ,reguarly patrol The southern part of the County Armagh that has been a stronghold of support for the IRA, earning it the nickname "Bandit Country" though this is widely regarded as an untrue media label that has resulted in the vilification and demonisation of the local community South Armagh is predominantly nationalist, with most of the population being opposed to any form of British presence, especially that of a military nature. The most prominent opposition to British rule was the Provisional IRA South Armagh Brigade.

2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers.
       
     
2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers on Ardoyne during the marching season . Ardoyne is bordered on the west by the Crumlin Road, an area which has for the most part a majority Protestant population and forms an interface area. On the Twelfth and during the rest of the marching season parades held by the Orange Order have led to conflict between the two communities. Controversy has been sparked by the differing attitudes of the two communities to the marches, with the Orange Order and their supporters arguing that they are following traditional parade routes, whilst their nationalist critics argue that the marches are triumphalist and not wanted in their area.Crumlin Road roundabout, with the Ardoyne shops on the left of the pictureFor the most part the Parades Commission has given permission for the Twelfth marches to go past the flashpoint Ardoyne shops, close to the Crumlin Road roundabout which also leads on to the Woodvale Road. One particular cause of conflict was that, in the past, marchers had carried flags associated with the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Ulster Defence Association (paramilitary Loyalist organisations), and played loyalist songs. In 2010, however, the Shankill Star flute band was banned from carrying a controversial banner depicting UVF member Brian Robinson.Since there are only two exits from the estate, residents on the opposite side of the Crumlin Road (Mountainview) are barricaded into their street by the police and Army for several hours throughout the day: in the morning when the march goes by; and in the evening when it returns. Local residents believe this to be a breach of their human rights. The Police Ombudsman concurs with this assessment but is of the opinion that the barriers are necessary for security reasons.

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2nd Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers
       
     
2nd Battalion, the Royal Fusiliers
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2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers
       
     
2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers

2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers Ardoyne during the marching season . Ardoyne is bordered on the west by the Crumlin Road, an area which has for the most part a majority Protestant population and forms an interface area. On the Twelfth and during the rest of the marching season parades held by the Orange Order have led to conflict between the two communities. Controversy has been sparked by the differing attitudes of the two communities to the marches, with the Orange Order and their supporters arguing that they are following traditional parade routes, whilst their nationalist critics argue that the marches are triumphalist and not wanted in their area.Crumlin Road roundabout, with the Ardoyne shops on the left of the pictureFor the most part the Parades Commission has given permission for the Twelfth marches to go past the flashpoint Ardoyne shops, close to the Crumlin Road roundabout which also leads on to the Woodvale Road. One particular cause of conflict was that, in the past, marchers had carried flags associated with the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Ulster Defence Association (paramilitary Loyalist organisations), and played loyalist songs. In 2010, however, the Shankill Star flute band was banned from carrying a controversial banner depicting UVF member Brian Robinson.Since there are only two exits from the estate, residents on the opposite side of the Crumlin Road (Mountainview) are barricaded into their street by the police and Army for several hours throughout the day: in the morning when the march goes by; and in the evening when it returns. Local residents believe this to be a breach of their human rights. The Police Ombudsman concurs with this assessment but is of the opinion that the barriers are necessary for security reasons.

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Irish Guards Crossmaglen
       
     
Irish Guards Crossmaglen

Irish Guards night patrol Crossmaglen village centre During the Troubles, at least 58 police officers and 124 soldiers were killed by the Provisional IRA in South Armagh, many in Crossmaglen itself. Incidents in Crossmaglen during the Troubles resulting in two or more fatalities:

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Irish Guards
       
     
Irish Guards

Irish Guards meet HRH Princess Ann during St Patricks Day South Armagh

Irish Guards
       
     
Irish Guards

Irish Guards meet HRH Princess Ann during St Patricks Day South Armagh

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Irish Guards
       
     
Irish Guards
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Royal Anglian Regiment
       
     
Royal Anglian Regiment

Royal Anglian Regiment Ballykelly honing their patrol skills and field craft

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Royal Anglian Regiment
       
     
Royal Anglian Regiment